phenomenology

Home / Posts tagged "phenomenology"
Walking from Montmartre to Montreuil

Walking from Montmartre to Montreuil

By Tadashi Uda (Hokkaido University)

The view from Sacré-Coeur was great. As the terrain in the center of Paris is relatively flat, I could look over the city from there for the first time after coming to Paris.

We found a map at the side of the stairs in front of Basilique. The cityscape of Paris seen from the Sacré-Coeur in 1939 was drawn. I was surprised that there was no big difference between the current landscape and the picture drawn. I wonder if there is a “mega” city that has not changed the figure for 80 years in Japan (Even in Kyoto, the city/landscape has changed a lot except historical sites and a part of areas). The change of the cityscape in Tokyo is tremendous.

Things around us in Paris and Tokyo, for example are almost same. However, I came up with the question that how the difference in

Read more
Sharing a bottle of wine: back to the roots of the sharing economy?

Sharing a bottle of wine: back to the roots of the sharing economy?

Still in Sydney, where I’ve had the opportunity to share a good bottle of wine today during lunch time. A good bottle of Australian pinot noir. For a wine lover, this is always a great experience. People drink their pint of beer in a pub. People can ‘share’ a bottle of wine. Sharing means both drinking together wine from the same bottle. Often, sharing the cost of it. But it means much more than this. It is a great opportunity for socialization. Firstly, when the waiter comes and asks who will taste first. This is of course a way to test if wine is ‘bouché’. But this also a great opportunity to valorize guests, place them in the ultimate position to judge and open the ritual. Depending on the experience, comments can then enrich the experience. Wine becomes melted into the discussion, part of a great phenomenogical experience. Mediating it, … Read more

Collaboration in an academic building: the case of UTS new building in Sydney

Collaboration in an academic building: the case of UTS new building in Sydney

First of all, I would like to say that I really like UTS new building designed by Franck Gehry. It makes me think about Gaudi’s productions in Barcelona. The façade is amazing. The stairs (see picture below) and new amphitheaters are highly iconic. Volumes, lights, wood, glasses, are part of a great aesthetic experience.

IMAG2230

But I wonder if all this really leaves a room for everyday activities of administrative and technical staff, academics and students. Making a tour of the place (with a major academic of UTS) was a fantastic experience. But the day after this visit, I started wondering about something. A couple of years ago, campus and academic buildings were designed first. Then, they were enacted through campus tours with parents and prospective students. Today (in particular for this building), it seems that the campus and building tour is designed first (all iconic artifacts and glamorous trajectories are … Read more